Scales For CBA


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Scales are essential for improving playing skills. For chromatic button accordion they have little different role than for piano accordion. Theoretical part is same - You learn how different keys sound, what key signatures each key has and how to read and transpose music. Differences are in technical part - CBA has much wider set of technical aspects that must be practiced and simple scales won't satisfy these needs. Much wider range of scales must be played to cover if not all then most of these aspects. This is the reason why CBA is much harder to learn and much easier to play and gives much more interesting possibilities than PA.

Chromatic button accordion has very good feature - there are only three fingering positions. With one position it is possible to play four different keys.

Fingering positions that I use are included with examples. Some standard fingering positions are from method books for B-system CBA, others are my own findings or inventions.

Playable keys in first position are C, E-flat or D-sharp, F-sharp or G-flat and A. Playable keys in second position are G, B-flat, D-flat or C-sharp and E. Playable keys in third position are F, A-flat or G-sharp, B and D.

Scales are usually practiced in two or three tempos. First tempo is slowest base tempo, example 60 BPM is suitable for beginners or for those who haven't played years. Second tempo is two times faster than first, example if first is 60 BPM then second is 120 BPM. Third tempo is two times faster than second tempo. Harder scales like broken quints may be played only in two tempos if base tempo is higher than 60 BPM, it makes easier to slowly increase base tempo for simpler scales without making harder ones impossible.

Contents

Simple Scales

Traditional single note scales, useful for scale like movements and runs. They are mandatory for developing correct hand position and increasing speed.

Natural major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural major III Position
F-natural-major
Natural major left hand fingering

Left hand fingering pattern is same in all keys! "c" under note indicates counter bass!

C-natural-major left hand
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Trioles

Trioles are useful for increasing speed and practicing scale like ornaments like E-F-E-D-E-D... - these are very common in french music.

Natural Major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural Major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural Major III Position
F-natural-major

Left hand is played like single note scale, one note per beat!


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Broken Quints

These are quite interesting and technical scales. My accordion teacher Jaak Lutsoja practiced these. He is piano accordion player, still these scales are very useful - hand is in chord and arpeggio positon.

Natural Major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural Major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural Major III Position
F-natural-major

Left hand is played like single note scale, one note per beat!


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Thirds

Scale like runs in thirds are common in waltzes

Natural Major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural Major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural Major III Position
F-natural-major

Left hand is played like single note scale, one note per beat!

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Sixths

Scale like movement in sixths are common in oberkrainer music.

Natural Major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural Major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural Major III Position
F-natural-major

Left hand is played like single note scale, one note per beat!


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Ovtaves

Octaves are used very often in arrangements or compositions for CBA.

Natural major I Position
C-natural-major
Natural major II Position
G-natural-major
Natural major III Position
F-natural-major

Left hand is played like single note scale, one note per beat!

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Nuuksu 2017